Hot answers tagged

74

I understand that logic doesn't always help in times of stress, but the first thing I want to assure you is that people are not going to run off with your things. This is something we all worry about but that essentially never happens. The folks who manage the checkpoint are monitoring and your things are not out there without you for more than a few seconds....


51

There is a website that I was hitherto completely unaware of that aims to cater for this need. Great British Public Toilet Map For tourists with smart phones it would be useful as it geolocates the nearest ones in their database (or allows manual search) and provides a facility to add crowd sourced toilet locations along with pertinent details. These ...


36

From an engineering point of view, a tram is a vehicle that takes electricity from somewhere (overhead wires or third rail underneath), use motors to convert this into torque, and spins wheels to move the tram. The obvious solution is put all this machinery at ground level, right next to the wheels, and put the passengers on top. Ta-dah, a high-floor tram. ...


33

Whenever you're planning a journey, consider if you really have to fly. I am Asperger myself, and I avoid flights (although not for the exact same reason as you). Between The Netherlands and the United Kingdom, there is absolutely no need to fly. There are three ferry links from The Netherlands to England: one to the south, one to the centre, and one to ...


33

Toilets are important, but not something to worry about. You don't need to make it this complicated. British people really don't mind when foreigners ask where is the nearest public toilet? We don't judge you for your unfortunate need. Go in any public place and ask. It requires no technology, and rather than planning your day around where the convenient ...


19

In the US, the TSA has a notification card and You or your traveling companion may consult the TSA officer about the best way to relieve any concerns during the screening process. The UK security process is not as clear, but https://www.gov.uk/airport-rights outlines the rights of disabled people at the airport. This website suggests Contact ...


18

Cost, and speed. Some public transport companies report that low floor trams have 15% higher maintenance costs for the rolling stock, and 20% higher maintenance costs for the infrastructure on average (source in German). The low-floor designs typically also decrease the speed at which a tram can drive through a curve (usually 4–15 km/h in 20 m radius curve)...


16

Heathrow Airport provides golf buggies for passengers with mobility issues, I have seen these in operation. You may have to request special assistance from your airline at least 48 hours in advance. The key point is that your airline is responsible for ensuring boarding assistance, they should be the ones you liaise with. Heathrow also provides porterage for ...


16

What you want here is the Avoiding stairs Tube guide, linked from the TfL Accessibility guides page. In this guide you will see that all the Heathrow stations, as well as King’s Cross St. Pancras, are marked with Lift access between street and platform, and additionally all have the Platforms with designated level access boarding point indication, which ...


14

Maybe you know it already, but might be helpful for other readers, too: wheelmap.org It's an OpenStreetMap where users can mark if places/buildings are wheelchair accessible. You can filter the map to only show places related to tourism. Also, at least in Germany, some cities/areas have accessibility guides that list accessible hotels, free time ...


11

The general answer is, because rail-borne rolling stock is expensive, it is only rational to expect trams to have a long life cycle. It is not unusual to see trams which are 30 years old, and in some places you can meet trams built in something like the 1930s and still in use. Thus, because low-floor tram designs are relatively new (introduced in 1980s and ...


11

I can't speak about other countries, but in the USA, contact TSA at the airport ahead of time and describe your issues. Most likely they will arrange for a TSA agent to escort you through security. You'll still have to do everything you would normally have to do (show ID, take off shoes, scan luggage, etc.), but the escort will bypass the lines and get you ...


10

The Oktoberfest homepage has some of information in English as well. Unfortunately the page about accessibility is only available in German (I'll include the information below). Going by car is pretty much impossible. Taxis are of course a different matter and perhaps an option to you. But fortunately, the festival ground is very central and easily ...


10

Can only answer question no 1 & 2 : Tokyo Metro is accessible for the disabled. Maps of World claims that "In the Tokyo Subway, there are special wheel chair access arrangements and ticket counters for the disabled passengers" Seems that not all stations support accessibility for disabled persons, even for major stations like Shibuya and ...


9

I was in the 'neighbourhood' of it last year. It's run by the Hualapai Nation, and still runs as normal. 9 miles of the 21 'country road' miles are unpaved. They say it's 2.5 hours from Las Vegas. I'd say it's more like 3.5 hours (and got that confirmed in Peach Springs), and if you want to do it on your way to/from the Grand Canyon, count on another 3.5 ...


9

tl;dr: In theory no, in practice yes. Most national monuments (e.g. Louvre, Musee d'Orsay, ...) are managed by the same organization and likely they stick to the same rules. I assume this is similarlay valid for other sights (e.g. Eiffel tower). In theory: The Louvre page on admissions states that entrance is free for disabled visitors and their ...


9

Since your parking venue in Fusina is Parcheggio custodito 24h, you probably have a simple solution, at least to solve the Blue Badge problem. Make a photocopy of your Blue Badge, and take the original and the photocopy to the car park attendant. Since the car park is staffed 24 hours per day, you can ask them to check your original and then annotate the ...


9

The tourism office has a website "München accessible for all!" with lots of information. For assistance at the airport: Information about „barrier-free traveling at Munich's Airport“ as well as the brochure „Barrierefrei“ can be found here: www.munich-airport.de/ .. /barriere.. or phone +49 (0) 89 / 9 75 00 and Flughafen München GmbH, Postfach 231755, ...


9

Some places have closed their council managed toilets at the same time as arranging that a nearby shop or pub or restaurant provides the same facility but without requiring any purchase (This is called the Community Toilet Scheme and most borough councils who use this scheme maintain their own list that you can find online). In some cases this change leads ...


9

All major towns and cities have public toilets, but they are generally not that easy to find (ask at the tourist information if you can find that) or pleasant to use. Free public toilets tend to attract vagrants and drug takers (this is my experience having lived in the UK all my life) A better solution is to go into a fast food restaurant and use their ...


8

In response to your question there are very few companies worldwide who can actually provide a broadbased service for wheelchair users such as you seem to be seeking. The majority of specialist tour providers are based in the USA (5 agencies), Canada (2 agencies), UK (1 agency and around 4 holiday/vacation based tour operators), Spain (my company Disabled ...


8

There is a bike rental at the Hauptbahnhof which offers rental of wheelchairs (although they don't specify, so I guess it's the non-electric ones), handbikes and electric scooters. There are some details including pictures and prices for the electric scooters on the website of the city of Cologne. The price is 10 € for 3 hours or 20 € per day plus a deposit ...


8

The formal document to be recognized as a disabled person in France can be obtained here : https://www.service-public.fr/particuliers/vosdroits/F2446 Obviously, this is not a realistic option for a traveler. Nevertheless, someone sitting in a wheelchair will be considered as a disabled person, and no one will try to check whether he/she is really disabled (...


7

Frommers lists that Bright Angel and North Kaibab trails are 'the canyon's smoothest' trails - but as you can see on my picture with a section of the Bright Angel trail, it's not really wheelchair accessible, and probably quite strenuous on crutches. Picture was taken in 2006, so it might look different today. Another option would be a mule trip, which ...


7

The short answer is yes, it's always technically possible for a disabled person to access any Tokyo Metro station. The long answer -- and this is from personal experience dealing with baby strollers in Tokyo -- is that while possible in theory, access is often seriously inconvenient in practice, eg. the station has 16 exits (not unusual in Tokyo...) and ...


7

If you want to go anywhere beyond what you can drive to, you need to join a tour or hire your own personal naturalist/guide. That's what my Galapagos guide said anyway. The crew on our ship were pretty good at helping folks in and out of the zodiac boats, but you'll want to evaluate whether this person will find getting in and out of boats too taxing. ...


7

Just looked it up on Transport for London's Journey Planner for Heathrow to King's Cross with Full step free access and TfL recommends taking the Heathrow Express to Paddington and then the Circle Line to King's Cross. Without Full step free access TfL recommends taking the tube straight to King's Cross via the Piccadilly line.


7

Which Stations Are Accessible? TMB says that all the Metro network is wheelchair accessible, except for a few stations (15 out of 156). These tend to be the older/non-recently-refurbished stations. The Barcelona Metro map lists them: This website lists all the stations with lifts. Locating Lifts TMB also says that you can locate accessible stations ...


7

From Terminal 2 you can follow the signs to "München Airport Center". This is the building were the train to Munich Hbf departs (called "München Flughafen Terminal" by Deutsche Bahn). The building is located right next to Terminal 2 and connected by a short walk. There is no need to take a bus or buy a ticket to get there. The train station (which is marked ...


6

They will also ask you to take your hands out of your pockets when going through the scanner, so maybe the inside of your pocket is not the best place to keep a plushy? Maybe you can make something that becomes an "accessory" that you can wear on the outside, for example a string/cloth hanging from a beltloop? From my many flight experiences, I've developed ...



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