Hot answers tagged

74

I understand that logic doesn't always help in times of stress, but the first thing I want to assure you is that people are not going to run off with your things. This is something we all worry about but that essentially never happens. The folks who manage the checkpoint are monitoring and your things are not out there without you for more than a few ...


36

From an engineering point of view, a tram is a vehicle that takes electricity from somewhere (overhead wires or third rail underneath), use motors to convert this into torque, and spins wheels to move the tram. The obvious solution is put all this machinery at ground level, right next to the wheels, and put the passengers on top. Ta-dah, a high-floor tram. ...


33

Whenever you're planning a journey, consider if you really have to fly. I am Asperger myself, and I avoid flights (although not for the exact same reason as you). Between The Netherlands and the United Kingdom, there is absolutely no need to fly. There are three ferry links from The Netherlands to England: one to the south, one to the centre, and one to ...


19

In the US, the TSA has a notification card and You or your traveling companion may consult the TSA officer about the best way to relieve any concerns during the screening process. The UK security process is not as clear, but https://www.gov.uk/airport-rights outlines the rights of disabled people at the airport. This website suggests Contact ...


18

Cost, and speed. Some public transport companies report that low floor trams have 15% higher maintenance costs for the rolling stock, and 20% higher maintenance costs for the infrastructure on average (source in German). The low-floor designs typically also decrease the speed at which a tram can drive through a curve (usually 4–15 km/h in 20 m radius ...


14

Maybe you know it already, but might be helpful for other readers, too: wheelmap.org It's an OpenStreetMap where users can mark if places/buildings are wheelchair accessible. You can filter the map to only show places related to tourism. Also, at least in Germany, some cities/areas have accessibility guides that list accessible hotels, free time ...


13

Heathrow Airport provides golf buggies for passengers with mobility issues, I have seen these in operation. You may have to request special assistance from your airline at least 48 hours in advance. The key point is that your airline is responsible for ensuring boarding assistance, they should be the ones you liaise with. Heathrow also provides porterage for ...


10

The general answer is, because rail-borne rolling stock is expensive, it is only rational to expect trams to have a long life cycle. It is not unusual to see trams which are 30 years old, and in some places you can meet trams built in something like the 1930s and still in use. Thus, because low-floor tram designs are relatively new (introduced in 1980s and ...


10

The Oktoberfest homepage has some of information in English as well. Unfortunately the page about accessibility is only available in German (I'll include the information below). Going by car is pretty much impossible. Taxis are of course a different matter and perhaps an option to you. But fortunately, the festival ground is very central and easily ...


10

I can't speak about other countries, but in the USA, contact TSA at the airport ahead of time and describe your issues. Most likely they will arrange for a TSA agent to escort you through security. You'll still have to do everything you would normally have to do (show ID, take off shoes, scan luggage, etc.), but the escort will bypass the lines and get you ...


9

I was in the 'neighbourhood' of it last year. It's run by the Hualapai Nation, and still runs as normal. 9 miles of the 21 'country road' miles are unpaved. They say it's 2.5 hours from Las Vegas. I'd say it's more like 3.5 hours (and got that confirmed in Peach Springs), and if you want to do it on your way to/from the Grand Canyon, count on another 3.5 ...


9

Can only answer question no 1 & 2 : Tokyo Metro is accessible for the disabled. Maps of World claims that "In the Tokyo Subway, there are special wheel chair access arrangements and ticket counters for the disabled passengers" Seems that not all stations support accessibility for disabled persons, even for major stations like Shibuya and ...


8

In response to your question there are very few companies worldwide who can actually provide a broadbased service for wheelchair users such as you seem to be seeking. The majority of specialist tour providers are based in the USA (5 agencies), Canada (2 agencies), UK (1 agency and around 4 holiday/vacation based tour operators), Spain (my company Disabled ...


8

There is a bike rental at the Hauptbahnhof which offers rental of wheelchairs (although they don't specify, so I guess it's the non-electric ones), handbikes and electric scooters. There are some details including pictures and prices for the electric scooters on the website of the city of Cologne. The price is 10 € for 3 hours or 20 € per day plus a deposit ...


7

Frommers lists that Bright Angel and North Kaibab trails are 'the canyon's smoothest' trails - but as you can see on my picture with a section of the Bright Angel trail, it's not really wheelchair accessible, and probably quite strenuous on crutches. Picture was taken in 2006, so it might look different today. Another option would be a mule trip, which ...


7

If you want to go anywhere beyond what you can drive to, you need to join a tour or hire your own personal naturalist/guide. That's what my Galapagos guide said anyway. The crew on our ship were pretty good at helping folks in and out of the zodiac boats, but you'll want to evaluate whether this person will find getting in and out of boats too taxing. ...


6

They will also ask you to take your hands out of your pockets when going through the scanner, so maybe the inside of your pocket is not the best place to keep a plushy? Maybe you can make something that becomes an "accessory" that you can wear on the outside, for example a string/cloth hanging from a beltloop? From my many flight experiences, I've developed ...


5

No problem at all, you might be asked to put it with the luggage inside the X-Ray scanner at the security check. Nothing special onboard, you will be asked to put it in an overhead bin if it fits (the crew will help you with that), or they will find a place to stow it. Remember, you can always request assistance from the airlines, they can provide you with ...


5

The best country to visit when in a wheelchair is most likely the US. All public places have to be wheelchair-accessible, and nobody steals the designated parking spots. What you want to visit depends on what you like most. There aren't that many old cities, of course (though e.g. Boston and San Francisco are nice), but there are plenty of amazing museums, ...


5

VocalEyes is a company that provides audio-guide creation services and training to museum staff for visually impaired visitors. They have a guide on what accessibility work they have done for museums (primarily ones in London), which itself may not cover all facilities available at these or other museums but is a starting point for understanding the kind of ...


4

The short answer is yes, it's always technically possible for a disabled person to access any Tokyo Metro station. The long answer -- and this is from personal experience dealing with baby strollers in Tokyo -- is that while possible in theory, access is often seriously inconvenient in practice, eg. the station has 16 exits (not unusual in Tokyo...) and ...


4

In Tokyo and all arround Japan you don't need to worry to travel as a handicaped person. Even if the station has no facilities for disabled all staff persons will help you to access where you need inside the metro or inside train stations. Yes, there are limited places where you can manage alone all, but don't worry, in Japan in the metro or train you are ...


4

The Osaka City Transport Station Guide to the rescue! Japanese only, but the station diagrams and their elevator icons are pretty self-explanatory. In both cases the red lines represent the Midosuji Line. Click on the 駅構内図を膨大 button in the top right corner to view expanded PDFs. Shin-Osaka: has elevators both to platform and street level Tennoji: also ...


4

You could do a lot worse than the Captain Cook Hop-On, Hop-Off Cruise. The ferries are all wheelchair-accessible and there's some basic guide-style commentary as well. The list price for the all-you-can-ride 24 hour pass is also $40 per head, but they've got good deals with many attractions so you can get, for example, the pass and Sydney Tower or Sea Life ...


4

I found Köln-Turismus company and wrote them. They gave me +49 0221 949755 - 0 and the E-mail Adress is info@stortz-koeln.de I'll write them - but did anybody hear about them? Manager from disabledaccessholidays.com said that, fortunately, they can provide an electric wheelchair in Köln, too. His colleague trying to organize a transfer. If it will be ...


4

Google shows a pub The Harrow* 0.6 miles north east, more or less on the 296 bus route (every 20 min). *Opening Hours: Mon: 11:00 - 23:00 Tue: 11:00 - 23:00 Wed: 11:00 - 23:00 Thu: 11:00 - 23:00 Fri: 11:00 - 23:00 Sat: 11:00 - 23:00 Sun: 12:00 - 22:30 Your image is distinctly more impressive than this one (from Google Maps)!: ...


4

The SFO webpage on accessibility mentions two interesting bits of information. First thing is, of course, that you should inform your airline of all particular needs you might have, for them to make the necessary arrangements. Secondly, according to the afore-mentioned website, airline staff is approachable in both Domestic and International terminals: ...


4

There are three things I'm going to suggest: Ask for assistance at check-in. They are able to assist people with various disabilities, they may be willing to assist you. It is worth trying. People in both the Netherlands and the UK seem very nice and understanding, you get a chance. Try to get yourself eligible for the fast track. The security at fast ...


3

From checking Great British Toilet Map, the nearest toilets to St Chad's Well appear to be: Marks Gate Cemetery, open Summer (April - September): 08.00 - 18.30 / Winter (October-March): 08.00 - 16.00, no charge. About 2km from the well. Other nearby toilets are at St Chad's Park or Wangey Road.


3

In general the airport staff does not automatically assist with disabled travelers. It almost always needs to be arranged through the airline on which you are traveling. It is advisable to contact the airline in advance to request wheel chair assistance, for all airports on the travelers itinerary. They will note this in your booking record and should ...



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