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35

From an engineering point of view, a tram is a vehicle that takes electricity from somewhere (overhead wires or third rail underneath), use motors to convert this into torque, and spins wheels to move the tram. The obvious solution is put all this machinery at ground level, right next to the wheels, and put the passengers on top. Ta-dah, a high-floor tram. ...


18

Cost, and speed. Some public transport companies report that low floor trams have 15% higher maintenance costs for the rolling stock, and 20% higher maintenance costs for the infrastructure on average (source in German). The low-floor designs typically also decrease the speed at which a tram can drive through a curve (usually 4–15 km/h in 20 m radius ...


13

Heathrow Airport provides golf buggies for passengers with mobility issues, I have seen these in operation. You may have to request special assistance from your airline at least 48 hours in advance. The key point is that your airline is responsible for ensuring boarding assistance, they should be the ones you liaise with. Heathrow also provides porterage for ...


12

Maybe you know it already, but might be helpful for other readers, too: wheelmap.org It's an OpenStreetMap where users can mark if places/buildings are wheelchair accessible. You can filter the map to only show places related to tourism. Also, at least in Germany, some cities/areas have accessibility guides that list accessible hotels, free time ...


10

The general answer is, because rail-borne rolling stock is expensive, it is only rational to expect trams to have a long life cycle. It is not unusual to see trams which are 30 years old, and in some places you can meet trams built in something like the 1930s and still in use. Thus, because low-floor tram designs are relatively new (introduced in 1980s and ...


9

Can only answer question no 1 & 2 : Tokyo Metro is accessible for the disabled. Maps of World claims that "In the Tokyo Subway, there are special wheel chair access arrangements and ticket counters for the disabled passengers" Seems that not all stations support accessibility for disabled persons, even for major stations like Shibuya and ...


8

The Oktoberfest homepage has some of information in English as well. Unfortunately the page about accessibility is only available in German (I'll include the information below). Going by car is pretty much impossible. Taxis are of course a different matter and perhaps an option to you. But fortunately, the festival ground is very central and easily ...


8

In response to your question there are very few companies worldwide who can actually provide a broadbased service for wheelchair users such as you seem to be seeking. The majority of specialist tour providers are based in the USA (5 agencies), Canada (2 agencies), UK (1 agency and around 4 holiday/vacation based tour operators), Spain (my company Disabled ...


7

I was in the 'neighbourhood' of it last year. It's run by the Hualapai Nation, and still runs as normal. 9 miles of the 21 'country road' miles are unpaved. They say it's 2.5 hours from Las Vegas. I'd say it's more like 3.5 hours (and got that confirmed in Peach Springs), and if you want to do it on your way to/from the Grand Canyon, count on another 3.5 ...


7

There is a bike rental at the Hauptbahnhof which offers rental of wheelchairs (although they don't specify, so I guess it's the non-electric ones), handbikes and electric scooters. There are some details including pictures and prices for the electric scooters on the website of the city of Cologne. The price is 10 € for 3 hours or 20 € per day plus a deposit ...


5

If you want to go anywhere beyond what you can drive to, you need to join a tour or hire your own personal naturalist/guide. That's what my Galapagos guide said anyway. The crew on our ship were pretty good at helping folks in and out of the zodiac boats, but you'll want to evaluate whether this person will find getting in and out of boats too taxing. ...


5

No problem at all, you might be asked to put it with the luggage inside the X-Ray scanner at the security check. Nothing special onboard, you will be asked to put it in an overhead bin if it fits (the crew will help you with that), or they will find a place to stow it. Remember, you can always request assistance from the airlines, they can provide you with ...


5

Frommers lists that Bright Angel and North Kaibab trails are 'the canyon's smoothest' trails - but as you can see on my picture with a section of the Bright Angel trail, it's not really wheelchair accessible, and probably quite strenuous on crutches. Picture was taken in 2006, so it might look different today. Another option would be a mule trip, which ...


4

The best country to visit when in a wheelchair is most likely the US. All public places have to be wheelchair-accessible, and nobody steals the designated parking spots. What you want to visit depends on what you like most. There aren't that many old cities, of course (though e.g. Boston and San Francisco are nice), but there are plenty of amazing museums, ...


4

VocalEyes is a company that provides audio-guide creation services and training to museum staff for visually impaired visitors. They have a guide on what accessibility work they have done for museums (primarily ones in London), which itself may not cover all facilities available at these or other museums but is a starting point for understanding the kind of ...


4

The short answer is yes, it's always technically possible for a disabled person to access any Tokyo Metro station. The long answer -- and this is from personal experience dealing with baby strollers in Tokyo -- is that while possible in theory, access is often seriously inconvenient in practice, eg. the station has 16 exits (not unusual in Tokyo...) and ...


4

In Tokyo and all arround Japan you don't need to worry to travel as a handicaped person. Even if the station has no facilities for disabled all staff persons will help you to access where you need inside the metro or inside train stations. Yes, there are limited places where you can manage alone all, but don't worry, in Japan in the metro or train you are ...


3

In general the airport staff does not automatically assist with disabled travelers. It almost always needs to be arranged through the airline on which you are traveling. It is advisable to contact the airline in advance to request wheel chair assistance, for all airports on the travelers itinerary. They will note this in your booking record and should ...


3

The SFO webpage on accessibility mentions two interesting bits of information. First thing is, of course, that you should inform your airline of all particular needs you might have, for them to make the necessary arrangements. Secondly, according to the afore-mentioned website, airline staff is approachable in both Domestic and International terminals: ...


3

I found Köln-Turismus company and wrote them. They gave me +49 0221 949755 - 0 and the E-mail Adress is info@stortz-koeln.de I'll write them - but did anybody hear about them? Manager from disabledaccessholidays.com said that, fortunately, they can provide an electric wheelchair in Köln, too. His colleague trying to organize a transfer. If it will be ...


3

The VisitPlymouth accessibility page lists the accessible features and attractions. They do include boat trips, which they cite as being accessible from the Barbican landing stage. They also have a link to a Google Maps mashup, which allows zooming in on any of the landings, even to Google StreetView. If that's not inspiring enough confidence, the best ...


3

Wheelmap.org can be very useful for you. It contains POIs with information wheter there are accessible for wheelchair. Here you have Canary Islands on Wheelmap (zoom in to see specific location with POIs). The biggest disadvantage of this map is that still majority of POIs are not described.


2

Bad news. While 888 will get you the teletext subtitles in Greece, Belgium and other countries, and Austria is 777, for example, Romania is one of the few EU members to have NONE for Teletext subtitling. Source: State of subtitling access in EU report - European Federation of Hard of Hearing People (page 20).


2

To the best of my knowledge, no such global resource exists -- and that's a slightly more assertive statement than most, since I was at Lonely Planet when accessible travel manager Martin Heng presented his research on precisely this. There are a bunch of local efforts of widely varying standards and quality, OpenBritain being one of the better ones. ...


1

I will use the http://disabledaccessholidays.com company I specified above, to hire wheelchair and car transfer. I communicated with them. They can help not only in Berlin and München, but in Köln, too. Hope this question can be useful for someone who will find it here. Thanks.



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