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11

Heathrow Airport provides golf buggies for passengers with mobility issues, I have seen these in operation. You may have to request special assistance from your airline at least 48 hours in advance. The key point is that your airline is responsible for ensuring boarding assistance, they should be the ones you liaise with. Heathrow also provides porterage for ...


9

Can only answer question no 1 & 2 : Tokyo Metro is accessible for the disabled. Maps of World claims that "In the Tokyo Subway, there are special wheel chair access arrangements and ticket counters for the disabled passengers" Seems that not all stations support accessibility for disabled persons, even for major stations like Shibuya and ...


8

The Oktoberfest homepage has some of information in English as well. Unfortunately the page about accessibility is only available in German (I'll include the information below). Going by car is pretty much impossible. Taxis are of course a different matter and perhaps an option to you. But fortunately, the festival ground is very central and easily ...


8

In response to your question there are very few companies worldwide who can actually provide a broadbased service for wheelchair users such as you seem to be seeking. The majority of specialist tour providers are based in the USA (5 agencies), Canada (2 agencies), UK (1 agency and around 4 holiday/vacation based tour operators), Spain (my company Disabled ...


7

I was in the 'neighbourhood' of it last year. It's run by the Hualapai Nation, and still runs as normal. 9 miles of the 21 'country road' miles are unpaved. They say it's 2.5 hours from Las Vegas. I'd say it's more like 3.5 hours (and got that confirmed in Peach Springs), and if you want to do it on your way to/from the Grand Canyon, count on another 3.5 ...


6

Maybe you know it already, but might be helpful for other readers, too: wheelmap.org It's an OpenStreetMap where users can mark if places/buildings are wheelchair accessible. You can filter the map to only show places related to tourism. Also, at least in Germany, some cities/areas have accessibility guides that list accessible hotels, free time ...


4

VocalEyes is a company that provides audio-guide creation services and training to museum staff for visually impaired visitors. They have a guide on what accessibility work they have done for museums (primarily ones in London), which itself may not cover all facilities available at these or other museums but is a starting point for understanding the kind of ...


4

In Tokyo and all arround Japan you don't need to worry to travel as a handicaped person. Even if the station has no facilities for disabled all staff persons will help you to access where you need inside the metro or inside train stations. Yes, there are limited places where you can manage alone all, but don't worry, in Japan in the metro or train you are ...


3

Wheelmap.org can be very useful for you. It contains POIs with information wheter there are accessible for wheelchair. Here you have Canary Islands on Wheelmap (zoom in to see specific location with POIs). The biggest disadvantage of this map is that still majority of POIs are not described.


3

The short answer is yes, it's always technically possible for a disabled person to access any Tokyo Metro station. The long answer -- and this is from personal experience dealing with baby strollers in Tokyo -- is that while possible in theory, access is often seriously inconvenient in practice, eg. the station has 16 exits (not unusual in Tokyo...) and ...


2

The best country to visit when in a wheelchair is most likely the US. All public places have to be wheelchair-accessible, and nobody steals the designated parking spots. What you want to visit depends on what you like most. There aren't that many old cities, of course (though e.g. Boston and San Francisco are nice), but there are plenty of amazing museums, ...



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