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Visas for many countries have an associated "maximum stay" (for example, the visa is valid for a maximum stay of 90 days). For those visas, how are the days counted, or does it vary based on country? Does the stay begin on the partial day that the traveler arrives or the first full day spent in the country. Does it end on the last full day spent in the country, or the actual day the traveler departs?

For example, if a hypothetical visa has a maximum stay of 15 days and the traveler arrives in country on the evening of the 1st, what is the last day he can leave?

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closed as not a real question by Dori Jul 9 '11 at 1:27

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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This question is far too vague to be answerable except as a list of every possible visa available — and then who's going to keep it up to date? –  Dori Jul 9 '11 at 1:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I can't say about all countries, but for the Schengen visa the partial day that the traveler arrives is a first day in a country. And the same is true for the last day - if you are going out of country at 00:01 AM, you are using another one day.

So, if you've arrived at 1st, last day you can move out without any problem - 15th of current month.

When you are entering the country, you got stamp in your document, on this stamp are the first day of your staying.

I think, in other countries rules are the same.

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Be more careful of this in countries known to suffer from corruption and bribery. Dodgy officials could be waiting with their fingers crossed to put the squeeze on somebody possibly half a day over whether technically the official law or not. –  hippietrail Jul 9 '11 at 5:34

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