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I would like to be able to state that I have travelled to all countries where there is a native community that understand and speaks Dutch. So far I have been in the Netherlands, Belgium, France, Suriname, and the Netherlands Antilles.

Where do I need to go to complete my wish list of visiting all Dutch speaking nations?

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What about South Africa? isn't that a broken Dutch and is understandable for you? –  MeNoTalk Jul 5 '12 at 20:16
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Afrikaans? It's not broken Dutch, it's enhanced Dutch ;) –  Mark Mayo Jul 5 '12 at 20:23
    
ok, good to know.. But I suppose both can understand each other.. –  MeNoTalk Jul 5 '12 at 21:12
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I am yet to meet the first Dutchman (m/f) who will be able to understand Cape Afrikaans without prior knowledge. Afrikaans from the Transvaal (say, northern South Africa), though, is typically much less of a problem. Afrikaans speakers, on the other hand, typically have less of an issue dealing with Dutch, mostly because they're used to a wider range of dialects. Then again, plenty of words have different meanings in Dutch and Afrikaans, meaning that a range of things are hard to understand on both sides. –  MastaBaba Jul 5 '12 at 21:28
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@MastaBaba do you have a (youtube) link so I can hear someone spekaing cape afrikaans? Don't underestemate the diversity in Dutch itself. The limburgian or west flemish dialects can be pretty hard to understand –  andra Jul 5 '12 at 22:07
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It depends how you define Dutch speaking—if there's a few expats hanging around that speak Dutch, you could probably include 100+ countries. However, Wikipedia has you covered for a list of countries where it's an official language, as well as major populations of Dutch speakers.

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And depending on if you define Dutch as standard Dutch. There are dialect speaking communities in Germany (think Krefeld, Duesseldorf, Aachen, but then outside of the cities), which is pretty much the Limburgian dialect. And those are definitely more numerous and more understandable then the few remaining speakers in department du Nord :-) –  Marco van de Voort 2 days ago
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While the Wikipedia page @redct referred to which shows the distribution, I'd be careful - as some of those are not the Dutch spoken in the Netherlands (eg Afrikaans). I can speak some Afrikaans and as a result understand some Dutch, but it's not totally the same.

There's another wiki page which lists the 8 countries that officially speak Dutch, which doesn't have the detail of the previous page, but simpler to quickly parse ;).

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On the page with 11 countries, the 'Netherlands Antilles' include five of the 11 listed on that page, as well as the Netherlands Antilles themselves. Suriname is listed in three versions of itself. So that leaves the exact list from the OP... –  MastaBaba Jul 5 '12 at 21:10
    
Not since October 2010 - only prior to that were places like Sint Maarten part of the Netherlands Antilles. At least, according to the introduction in en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sint_Maarten ... –  Mark Mayo Jul 5 '12 at 21:12
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True. It means it depends on what the OP refers to with 'Netherlands Antilles'. (But, anyway, I personally would consider the individual islands as individual destinations, whether part of the NA or not.) –  MastaBaba Jul 5 '12 at 21:17
    
Its even more complicated since saba, bonaire and st eustacius are now special municipalities of the netherlands. From a travelers perspective I prefer to see them as distinct countries –  andra Jul 5 '12 at 22:14
    
Definitely, I'd count them separately. It's an interesting one, like some people count the UK as one country (you really shouldn't). And then mosttraveledpeople.com or whatever counts NZ as 5 separate zones. 5! –  Mark Mayo Jul 5 '12 at 22:23
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