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I arrive in Kuala Lumpur's KLIA2 airport and depart several hours later from the main KLIA. The train between the airports is RM2, which seems likely to be far below the minimum withdrawal from an ATM there. What's the cheapest way to buy the ticket? I have a US MasterCard and a few Singapore dollars in cash (too little to exchange for ringgit at the FX counters in Singapore airport).

(If it's not clear what I mean by "cheapest", since the ticket is RM2 no matter what, I'd prefer spending my leftover Singapore dollars over spending exactly RM2 using my debit card, over withdrawing more money from an ATM and spending RM2 from that.)

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Maybe someone on the platform would buy you one in exhcange for your singapore dollars, or a coffee at the other airport? – CMaster Jan 25 at 10:43
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The cost is 2 Malaysian Ringits to get between terminals (source).

Unfortunately, you can't buy the transfer tickets on their website, like the other journeys, you have to buy at the counter.

If you have some left over Singapore money, you could go to a money exchange place and swap it (presumably there's a minimum), and use the remainder to buy a nasi lemak or a coffee.

Alternatively, while their FAQ page states that they don't accept foreign currency, they do accept Visa and Mastercard payments.

Or ask another tourist to swap some coins, make a friend and buy them coffee in exchange!

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Use a credit card: there's no minimum, so yes, you can pay for that RM2 fare with your MasterCard.

Cityliner also runs KLIA<->KLIA2 buses for RM1.50 a pop,and they might accept Singapore dollars at a 1:1 exchange rate; normally quite a bad deal, but if you don't have any use for your leftover S$, it's essentially "free".

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