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Im flying to Texas, El Paso on the 15th of October 2014, this is on a visa waiver program.

I wish to fly to Arizona, Sky Harbor on the 17th of October 2014 for the day to say Hi to long distance friends and return to El Paso later in the day.

Question is;

Can I fly inside the USA with my Visa Waiver?

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marked as duplicate by Karlson, Gagravarr, Flimzy, mindcorrosive Aug 19 at 21:04

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
My question is aimed at will my visa waiver be valid for travel inside of the us away from my original destination. Not at will my passport work. –  Zacharia Samuel Grierson Aug 18 at 13:57
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A different state in the US is not a different country. –  Karlson Aug 18 at 13:59
    
Related: travel.stackexchange.com/questions/10226/… –  Karlson Aug 18 at 14:02
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Mind you, it's probably debateable whether ESTA really is a visa-waiver, or just an unusually-easy-to-obtain visa in a novel format. I guess all countries with reciprocal visa-waiver arrangements with the US have opted not to press the point ;-) –  Steve Jessop Aug 18 at 16:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes, you can, and I have, as evidence. I flew a very similar route, from Austin to Phoenix, and then on to San Fran. I've also done other internal flights. All on the Visa-Waiver Program.

The visa-waiver is a check done at the international border, as you enter the US from another country. Once you're within the strict US border, you're permitted to travel (legally) however you want, wherever you want.

You may still be asked to present your passport as identification for flights, but the visa-waiver aspect won't be checked by immigration - it's simply an ID check by ticket and gate agents at the airport.

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Thanks for the information. –  Zacharia Samuel Grierson Aug 18 at 14:24
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"[T]he visa-waiver aspect won't be checked by immigration". And the reason for this is that nothing is checked by immigration because you don't go through immigration on internal flights. –  David Richerby Aug 18 at 16:51
    
@DavidRicherby Isn't that what the rest of the sentence implies? –  Relaxed Aug 18 at 17:57
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@Relaxed Saying just "The visa-waiver aspect won't be checked by immigration" leaves open the possibility that immigration check some things, just not visa-waiver status. The asker clearly isn't familiar with VWP and US internal flights (if they were, they wouldn't be asking the question) so I think it's best to state explicitly that immigration has nothing to do with internal flights. –  David Richerby Aug 18 at 18:08
    
"but the visa-waiver aspect won't be checked by immigration" There are some airport immigration checkpoints in areas near the Mexican border. See e.g. nbcnews.com/news/latino/… –  user102008 Aug 18 at 22:53

To my knowledge, all USA visas let you travel within the country without restrictions. The purpose of visa is to control entry at the border.

This also applies to the visa waiver program.

You can find additional information about the visa waiver program in this brochure.

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