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I have an upcoming travel for a conference in country A. But their consulate is pretty busy and I would like to get my visa sooner.

Can I go to the consulate of a different country B which doesn't need appointment for visa applications and get my visa from there? I can schedule to be in A for 5 days and in B for 7 days.

What if I change my plans later not to visit country B at all and go a country C or just stay in A the whole time? Will there be issues when entering or exiting Schengen states?

EDIT: I called consulate of country B and talked with the visa officer. He told me since you are visiting country A for a conference that is your main destination even though you spend more time in A. He said the rules say: 1. main destination 2. if no, longest stay 3. if no, entrance. He told me that he is reluctant to issue me a visa and asked me to contact country A's consulate, if they don't take the application he will review it.

I called consulate of country A. First the operator told me to go to B then after telling her that I am going to A for business (conference), she told me that I should apply at theirs (A).

Looks like the key thing here is the conference not where I spend most of my time.

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Interesting lateral thinking! –  pnuts Jul 26 at 3:17

3 Answers 3

There are already many questions touching upon the subject (although perhaps no exact duplicate):

In a nutshell: going to different countries or changing plans with a multiple-entry visa valid for more than six months is not a problem at all. Using a single-entry visa for an entirely different purpose is a bit more tricky and showing up somewhere completely unexpected with no credible story can create problems. In your scenario, since you already know you don't really want to go to country B, you would in fact be committing fraud.

Incidentally, submitting a conference invitation/registration in country A could suggest that your real destination is country A and your random trip to country B was just added to skirt the regulations. In practice, it might be difficult for the consulate or the border guards to notice it and you might therefore be OK but it is certainly a valid reason to deny or annul the visa.

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You are supposed to apply for your Schengen Visa at the consulate/embassy of the country in which you are spending the bulk of your time. Or if none are taking the majority of your time, then you are supposed to apply to the first country to be entered.

Your itinerary of 5 and 7 days is probably in the gray area between the two. Best bet contact Embassy B and ask if you can apply.

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My actual question was what if I get visa from B and not visit B at all or shorten my stay in B. –  Mohammad Moghimi Jul 25 at 23:20
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I don't think that shortening your stay in B will have an effect on your trip, but skipping B all together might. There was a group to Thai tourists that got their visa from one country for a multi-country tour, then never visited the issuing country. They had a run in with immigration upon departure, but were eventually allowed out. The tour operator was fined though, but not the travelers. –  Tom Jul 26 at 13:31

There will be no issues. Once you have a Schengen Visa your itinerary can change. You will not be asked why you are not traveling to Country B. Even if they do, you can cite a change of plans and they won't care much.

Of course this only makes sense with a Uniform 'C' visa.

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what is a C visa? –  Mohammad Moghimi Jul 26 at 1:36
    
A typical tourist/business visa is a C visa. –  Aditya Somani Jul 26 at 1:37

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