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We are a family of 7 going on a holiday to Florida. The flight is with British Airways and was booked by my brother, and he paid for all our flights with his credit card.

The British Airways Login Page shows his wife's name and email as contact details even though he paid for everything through his credit card.

They have separated now, hence his wife has threatened to replace his name with someone else's. Can she change or cancel his flight in any way i.e can she tamper with the tickets in any way?

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I think the best thing for you to do in this situation is to call the airline, explain the situation, and see what their policy is regarding your flights. –  Greg Hewgill Jul 14 at 23:58
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Why is this being downvoted? Yes it may be easier to call the airline, but it's still a valid travel question, surely? –  Mark Mayo Jul 15 at 0:06
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I would suggest taking off all of the irrelevant details. Separation, relationships, none of that is relevant to the basic question being asked. –  CGCampbell Jul 15 at 0:34
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Perhaps the paying passenger can call and remove the non-paying-passenger-who-wants-to-cancel-the-reservation. –  MeNoTalk Jul 15 at 3:38
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For what it's worth, the BA site (at least the UK version) has a clickthrough before you do anything, that says you represent all the passengers. So even if the system lets the wife play some mischief, she might see that it's unwise to do so under a false declaration. –  Steve Jessop Jul 15 at 10:40

2 Answers 2

The best you can do to be in the safe side in this case is having your borther login to his BA account and change the contact numbers and optionally remove her from the reservation.

If for some reason the reservation was not made from your brother's BA account then have him visit a BA office and show his credit card and then change the contact name and number. This way he will be in total control of the reservation. Usually airlines match the last four digits of the credit card used for the payment and/or contact information for any changes.

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In short, no, at least in theory, and assuming the booking was made from his account. British Airways' General Conditions of Carriage state:

10a2) Unless we say otherwise, we will only make a refund to the person who paid for the ticket.

10a3) You must, if you want a refund, prove to us that you are the person who paid for the ticket.

In practice, this does not necessarily stop the wife from calling British Airways and trying to cancel or alter the ticket, especially if she can pull off a bit of social engineering. However, most airlines require PINs etc specifically to stop this, and pretending to be him or to have his permission would qualify as fraud.

If your brother is genuinely worried, have him call the airline and ask them to add a note to the ticket record (PNR) saying that he must be contacted before any changes can be made.

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You answer misses one key point, it could be possible that the booking is made from his wife's account since the OP mentions that the BA login page shows his wife's contact details. Also, she might still be able to change the flight if not cancel it? What if she changes it to next year? –  Aditya Somani Jul 15 at 8:02
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Automatic cancellation systems in some airlines recognize the phone number and match it with the PNR, if it is the same number it will proceed with the cancellation. Not sure if BA has an IVR for cancellation, but if it does then the person who has his/her number in the PNR is in control at least for the cancellation even if it was not made from his/her account. –  MeNoTalk Jul 15 at 8:31
    
@AdityaSomani: As said, this assumes the booking was made by the brother with his own account, but the OP certainly implies it was ("was booked by my brother"). –  jpatokal Jul 15 at 12:10

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