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I'm planning to visit Morocco this summer with my girlfriend, from 20/07 to 3/08.

We'll arrive during Ramadan, and I've heard and read many things about the change of lifestyle there, but at the end, I can't figure if it's the good time for this trip.

What I know so far is :

  • Nobody eats during the daytime until the sun goes down (that's a sure thing),
  • So, no shop (included food shops) are opened until then (with hard temperatures...), and every streets are kind of desert in the afternoon,
  • Some touristic facilities might be closed too (are transports available by the way?),
  • Men avoid to talk to women too, cause it can lead to a "desire" sin (not that nice for my girlfriend),
  • People might be less inclined to talk to us travellers?

Considering these few points, I begin to think about reconsidering this travel...

Could you confirm my thoughts, what else can I expect from this situation? Is this a good / bad idea to maintain this trip?

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Note for future visitors: I'm still open to other points of view –  Bigood Jun 24 at 7:53

2 Answers 2

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Nobody eats during the daytime until the sun goes down (that's a sure thing),

This is true, and Morocco is one of the strictest countries in this regard! Unlike Tunisia, Lebanon or Syria for example.

So, no shop (included food shops) are opened until then (with hard temperatures...), and every streets are kind of desert in the afternoon,

Not really true, restaurants are closed until late afternoon, but groceries and other shops will be open.

Some touristic facilities might be closed too (are transports available by the way?),

Transportation will not be a problem at all (except for an hour or so at sunset because people will break their fasting at that time), night life will be almost dead, other facilities will be fine, just timings might be different.

Men avoid to talk to women too, cause it can lead to a "desire" sin (not that nice for my girlfriend),

Not true, you can talk normally to ladies. Ladies will be dressed more conservatively.

People might be less inclined to talk to us travellers?

Not true.

If I were you, and I wouldn't have to pay any fees to change the times, I would change the times a month forward. I guess you will miss some activaties, especially beach activities, the weather will be hot also and not being able to drink or eat in public during the day will really be an issue for you.

Last thing, as a foreigner your actions will surely be tolerated there, so if you decided to go do not over think this, just act normally and remember Morocco is a tourists attraction and people there are used to tourists at all times.

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Thank you for your detailed answer! Could you elaborate more on what you mean by "night life that will be almost dead"? You mean, like everybody's home with family? –  Bigood Jun 23 at 20:49
    
And moreover, would this also be true for Turkey? –  Bigood Jun 23 at 20:50
    
@Noclip by night life I meant clubs and stuff.. –  MeNoTalk Jun 23 at 21:28
    
@Noclip and regarding turkey, I never been there during Ramadan, but I know that they are not strict, go for it. –  MeNoTalk Jun 23 at 21:29
    
Alright, thanks for the informations! –  Bigood Jun 23 at 21:35

I would not personally travel to Morocco during this time, based on my experience in traveling in Muslim countries (actually during Ramadan, by mistake and more than once). I would be OK with going to Turkey but I would not go to Morocco.

  • First, you're not just traveling during Ramadan, you're traveling on the last week. Which after a month of daytime fasting, kids being home from school, well just imagine it can be exhausting for those observing.
  • Second, you'll be there for Eid, which is the end of Ramadan and can often end up in rioting (or just celebratory gunfire that will scare the sh*t out of you). I wouldn't call an Eid celebration I'd like to experience again as a non-Muslim traveler.
  • Technically speaking 'travelers' are exempt from fasting requirements, so it's not like you would be breaking any rules.
  • You'll want to eat in the daytime. And no matter how accommodating people are, I know I felt a bit bad eating in front of people fasting. As far as I remember, restaurants in Morocco are closed, while those in Turkey remain open, but nobody eating or smoking in view.
  • I don't know about Morocco, but in other places people go around with drums to make sure that Muslims wake up in time to cook & eat a pre-dawn meal, before fasting starts again. Probably if you're in a resort it's not relevant, but yeah, another reason it's not an ideal time to travel.
  • Night life could be more interesting because there are special meals for Iftar, more people in the mosques & special hymns. But if you're into drinking alcohol and partying it's not really a great time.

Bottom line: If you can push your visit back by just 8 days, you can avoid any of these issues. If you've stuck with those dates, Turkey would be much more enjoyable.

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