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Soon I hope to cross the border from Turkey to the Republic of Georgia and need to work out my money.

To minimize horrendous and unavoidable bank fees I prefer to withdraw larger amounts less frequently. But if a border crossing is imminent I need to know I can change my money in time and not at a rip-off rate. If I can't change money OK at the border I would withdraw a smallish amount in Turkey and then withdraw a larger amount when I get to Georgia and just have to suffer the extra fees.

So is there a money changer at the Turkey/Georgia border? Are the rates for changing Turkish Lira to Georgian Lari decent?

Turkey/Georgia border crossing

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I crossed the border from Turkey to Georgia about midnight last night.

There were no obvious exchange booths like at many borders but I didn't go into the duty free store.

I'm now in Tbilisi and most exchange places I've seen (of which there are many) only display rates for USD, EUR, and RUB.


UPDATE
I've now been in Georgia almost seven months and can say that at least in Tbilisi and Batumi it is not hard to find money changers that deal in TRY as well as AMD and AZN. But along with RUB the rates are very bad. The rates for USD and EUR are fair though.

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I have had good luck exchanging money with the assistants who work on buses travelling to and from Turkey. If nothing else, they can often point you to an unofficial money changer at the border. If you are stuck with TL in Tbilisi, a trip to the bus station might pay off. –  SigueSigueBen May 25 '12 at 1:11

Lari to Lira exchange is not recommended, you should use USD as the middle currency. that way you would lose only acceptable exchange fees instead of very big margins.

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USD or EUR, I presume? –  Jonik May 24 '12 at 19:53
    
An even better way is to exchange at official rates without overheads or charges with travellers going in the opposite directions. But sometimes you still end up with some money you want to change when you get to the border. –  hippietrail May 24 '12 at 20:45

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