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Wikivoyage warns against franc/ariary confusion in Madagascar:

The former currency Malagasy Franc (Franc Malgache) was replaced in 2005 by the Ariary (Ar-ee-ar) which is worth 5 Francs. For example, 10,000 Francs = 2000 Ariary. When negotiating a price, ALWAYS CONFIRM THE AMOUNT IN ARIARY. Many locals take advantage of tourists by simply stating the amount due without specifying the currency, so many tourists are duped into paying 5 times the actual amount due because of Franc/Ariary confusion.

Now in 2014, is this still a risk?

For each price, should I really ask the vendor whether it is franc or ariary?

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why not just assume its ariary all the time since its worth more? –  JonathanReez Apr 13 at 14:20
    
@JonathanReez: That's exactly the problem. If someone says "It costs 5" and they mean francs, and you pay ariaries, you've paid 5 times too much. –  Flimzy Apr 13 at 17:17
    
Oh, you mean the prices street vendors post on their stalls? I've originally thought it's an issue where (say) a taxi driver quotes you "500" and then asks for Ariary instead of Francs. –  JonathanReez Apr 13 at 17:26
    
@JonathanReez: I think either scenario would apply to the situation. Why would it matter? The question is valid in either. –  Flimzy Apr 14 at 4:14
    
It never hurts asking the vendor if the pricetag doesn't mention a currency –  GroundZero Apr 27 at 19:24
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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I was visiting in 2012 and during my 3 week trip, which took me to quite some remote areas I only came across one shop that still had a conversion table hung out. also no taxi-scams or other things happened to me.

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