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I am a citizen of India (third-country national?) and I currently reside in the United States. I will be joining a job in France on a "Long stay French visa". I was looking around the web to see if I could find correct information about whether or not I would be allowed to travel freely within the Schengen states on a long stay visa.

I came across this answer which says that "Third-country nationals who are long-term residents in a Schengen state may also acquire the right to move to and settle in another Schengen state without losing their legal status and social benefits."

So assuming that I am a "third country" national, how do I acquire the right to travel for tourism?

I am yet to apply for a long stay visa but I was just considering my options and possibilities right now.

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You're misunderstanding the answer. You always have the right to travel for tourism. You can acquire the right to "move and settle" which means become a resident of a different Schengen State (country). And yes you are third country national. –  Karlson Jan 21 at 18:25
    
@Karlson Is it possible to point out the right source for this information. I understand what you mean by "right to travel for tourism" but one can never be too careful! Thanks. –  drN Jan 21 at 18:30
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I am not even sure I understand your question. Why would anyone stop you from leaving the country? This isn't the old Soviet Union... –  Karlson Jan 21 at 18:33
    
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No it won't but do remember that the UK is very close to France, a common location for conferences and the like but is not in Schengen. Working at a university, I have many colleagues who had to deal with this particular issue at one point or another. –  Relaxed Jan 21 at 21:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you are a resident of one of the Schengen countries you can automatically travel in the other Schengen countries. This is not something you need to "acquire".

In theory the 90/180 rule applies, but in practice there are no border checks between Schengen countries, and your movements are not tracked, so you are basically free to travel where you want, when you want.

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Interesting. I think the answer I alluded to confused me with the way it was worded. It seemed that I would need to acquire the right to move between countries. Thank you for your perspective on this. –  drN Jan 22 at 18:15
    
While there are no border checks within the Schengen Area, it's worth bearing in mind that a non-EEA national with a valid visa for one Schengen country does not necessarily have a valid right to be in other Schengen states. If someone happened to get into trouble with the police, for example, then they might get into more trouble with they were, for example, in Austria when they only had a valid visa to be in Germany. –  Owen Blacker Apr 13 at 19:57

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