Take the 2-minute tour ×
Travel Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for road warriors and seasoned travelers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know, the question might sounds very controversial, but i often heard rumours about horrible experience in some airports

  • Major airports in US (most of the stories)
  • Airport in Japan (Highly questionable)
  • Airport in Europe (Highly questionable).

It is said that random passenger require to strip their clothes down. Is this story true? Have you ever seen or experienced this ?

If yes, is it performed in a concealed room or right in the middle of the crowds (where everybody can see)?

I find it hard to believe this story since major airport is equipped with X-Ray scanner and further patting down scenario (by hand) is sometimes performed to assessed random passenger for possible threat.

Quoting from: http://www.civilrightsmovement.co.uk/consequences-for-refusing-full-airport-body-scan.html

Extra Security Measures taken at Airports Undergoing a full body scan at airports may not actually be the end of the airport security checks. If for some reason the scanner cannot make a full assessment of the passenger then a strip search may be necessary. Passengers will then be required to enter a private area where they will be asked to explain any abnormalities. If security officials are still not satisfied the passenger may be required to remove layers of clothing until the security officials are satisfied. Passengers do have the right for a body search to be made by members of the same sex.

media reference:

share|improve this question

closed as unclear what you're asking by LessPop_MoreFizz, Dirty-flow, Gagravarr, Vince, gerrit Oct 10 '13 at 11:45

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Your quote already says that it will be in a private area, with same-sex screeners -- if requested. Basically security can prevent you entering the air-side part of the airport, the have fairly broad powers to request things like this -- you have the right to refuse (although you'll probably not get to fly). But normal x-rays and pat-downs are the norm -- a strip search would only happen if they were suspicious of something. –  SpaceDog Oct 10 '13 at 4:24
3  
There's 2 things here you're confusing: the full body scanners don't require you to strip (though you may have to take off belts, watches, jewelry, and shoes, just like a regular X-ray scan). If you're detained and they want to do a (partial) strip search THEN you'll have to strip to your undies or beyond. And as spacedog points out, they're fully in their right to demand you do that (and can just arrest you and then demand it, at which point you lose the right to refuse). –  jwenting Oct 10 '13 at 5:27
    
The travel writer Pico Iyer who lives as an expat in Japan has written of how the longer he lives there the more he is hassled at the airport when returning from overseas, including regular strip searches. [1] [2] (more references pretty easy to find via Google.) –  hippietrail Oct 10 '13 at 6:01
    
@jwenting Who is “they”? I would think that in many countries, detaining and/or coercing a strip search would need to involve the police and not merely airport security. Also being arrested sometimes comes with well-defined rights, like asking for an attorney, a medical doctor or being informed of the charges being retained so it might in fact make the process slightly less arbitrary should things deteriorate that far. –  Relaxed Oct 10 '13 at 14:24
1  
@Annoyed in many countries airport security is a police function. Often a special division, maybe paramilitary or military police. In some countries it's border guards. Maybe they have some rentacops to flesh out the ranks, but those still have people with arrest authority as their immediate supervisors on scene. And those rights too, in many countries you don't have them, or at the very least the officers know full well that you're unlikely to exercise them as it makes it that much more likely you'll miss your flight. –  jwenting Oct 14 '13 at 7:30