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In the HitchWiki entry for Laos it says:

It is illegal to sleep outside in Laos. If you are caught, you will be fined. [source required]

As you can see nothing is offered to indicate the veracity of this claim and the WikiVoyage article has nothing to say on the matter. So is it true?

If it is true what does it actually cover? Sleeping on the streets in cities? Sleeping anywhere in the open? Wild camping? Are there even campsites?

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Related: Where in Southeast Asia is free camping permitted? (Difference is this question is specifically Laos, which got no answers in the older question, plus this one also covers other similar sleeping options.) –  hippietrail Sep 14 '13 at 7:48

1 Answer 1

You can go camping in the Phou Khao Khouay national park north of Vientiane. In the Nah Ha park, you can stay in some bamboo huts. There is also a campsite at the Tad Leuk Waterfalls. I am sure there are more.

So to answer that part of your question, there are campsites.

Sleeping outside in an unprotected area by yourself can be tricky by the way since there are some poisonous snakes in Laos. I would be careful. This page here also states that it is dangerous but they think you might get robbed, specially inside the national park mentioned above. This site here says it's tolerated in some areas, but not actually legal. I read about bikers riding through the country and camping where they want to. Since a lot of places do not have any police coverage, and since they try to promote tourism, I think outside of cities you should be fine, but then again, there is the security aspect.

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Yes I did wonder if it could be illegal due it being dangerous but I thought I'd ask about the legality first. This is good info thanks. –  hippietrail Sep 15 '13 at 4:40

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